Do You Believe In Karma?
Karma is a somewhat abstract concept to many of us. There is a lot of confusing information on this non-religious topic – information which is unnecessary. So, I think it’d be helpful to paint a bit of a picture to help solidify the concept of karma. To do so, just a quick example is necessary.

Say that we are all willing to go around and help people in any way we see fit – putting coins in expired parking meters, holding doors open for everyone, giving a couple dollars to a homeless person, buying someone’s coffee or tea, etc., etc.

Now two questions: What is the possibility that the person we’ve helped will reciprocate, or “pay it forward”? What’s the possibility that this action created a positive source of energy?

That’s a very basic example of everyday karma. Of course, there is negative karma as well. Gandhi explains such in a simple yet profound way:

“A man is but the product of his thoughts. What he thinks, he becomes.”
Now that we have the basic understanding established, let's take a look at some of the concepts and laws of Karma.
1. The Great Law: “As you sow, so shall you reap.”

The simple explanation of the Great Law is: our thought and actions have consequences – good or bad. If we desire peace, love, harmony, prosperity, etc. we must be willing to act accordingly.

2. The Law of Creation: “What we desire comes through participation.”

The life we see around us was created by a person’s intentions. As we are one with the Universe, our intentions determine the evolution of creation. Since what we surround ourselves with becomes part of us, it’s our responsibility to ensure these surroundings are conducive to our desires.

3. The Law of Humility: “Refusal to accept what is will still be what is.”

Acceptance is a near-universal virtue in many belief systems. Simply put, we must first accept the present circumstances in order to change them. In focusing on the negative instead of making changes to address the negative, we’re committing to a zero-sum result.

4. The Law of Growth: “Our own growth is above any circumstance.”

The only thing we have control over is ourselves. The subsequent action (or inaction) of motive will yield either positive or negative circumstances in our lives. True change only occurs if we make the commitment to change what is in our heart.

5. The Law of Hospitality and Giving: “Demonstrating our selflessness shows true intentions.”

Put simply: what we claim to believe must manifest into our actions. Selflessness is a virtue only if we’re accommodating something other than ourselves. Without a selfless nature, true spiritual growth is nearly impossible.

6. The Law of Patience and Reward: “Nothing of value is created without a patient mindset.”

Toiling away cannot be circumvented through wishful thinking. Our rewards are claimed only through patience and persistence, nothing else. Rewards are not the end-result. True, lasting joy comes from the knowledge of doing what’s necessary in the rightful anticipation of a reward that is well-earned.

7. The Law of Change: “History repeats itself unless changed.”

Conscious commitment to change is the only method of influencing the past. History will continue along an unconstructive path until positive energies direct it elsewhere.

Energy and intentions are vital components that determine the significance of an end-result. Ideally, love and passion embody the motives of one that resolves to leave a lasting impression on the Whole.

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